Wednesday, May 8, 2013

The Fisherman and His Wife - Cut and Tell Story

This is part of a series of posts about Telling One Story Five Ways. It is also my Flannel Friday contribution for this week.

A cut and tell story will capture an audience's attention. Children want to see what you are cutting out and often try to guess. It is also great to take "on the road" since a piece of paper and a pair of scissors is all you need. All the preparation is done ahead of time. The storyteller just has to be careful that the audience does not see that part or the "magic" will be spoiled.

This cut and tell version of The Fisherman and His Wife is fairly easy to do. Years ago I told a more complicated version. I think it can be found in Paper Stories by Jean Stangl. I told it probably 15 years ago and I no longer have access to the book so I'm hoping I have the correct title. In this version, the storyteller is cutting out a crown. Use gold or yellow 8.5" x 11" paper. It can be easily crumpled at the end of the story. Fold the paper in half from top to bottom. Place the left side of the pattern along the fold and trace the pattern onto the paper with a pencil.

The Fisherman and His Wife - A Cut and Tell Story
by Linda Meuse
Notes from the Story Room

Long ago there was a fisherman who lived with his wife in a tiny shack by the sea. They had nothing but tfisherman was content.

One day the fisherman caught a most unusual fish. (Cut out A - the fish) The fish could talk! It asked the fisherman to set him free. The fisherman set him free and went home to tell his wife about his strange experience. "You should have made the fish grant you a wish since you spared his life," said the wife. "Go back and tell him that I want to live in a nice house." The fisherman went back to the sea. (Cut from 1 to 2) He called, "Oh wondrous fish, my wife has a wish." The fish rose out of the waves (Show fish) and asked, "What does she want?" "My wife wants to live in a nice house," answered the fisherman. "Her wish is granted," said the fish diving back into the sea. The fisherman returned home (Cut from 2 to 3) to find a nice house where the shack had been.

Alas, the wife was not content. She wanted more. "Go to the fish and tell him I want to live in a fine mansion," said the wife. The fisherman returned to the sea (Cut from 3 to 4) and called the fish. "Oh wondrous fish, my wife has a wish," said the fisherman. Again the fish rose above the waves (Show fish) and asked, "What does she want?" The fisherman answered, "My wife wants to live in a fine mansion." "Her wish is granted," replied the fish as he went back into the sea. The fisherman returned home (Cut from 4 to 5) to find a fine mansion where the house had been.

Still the wife was not content. She told her husband, "Go tell the fish that I want to become king and live in a castle." Again the fisherman went to the sea (Cut from 5 to 6) and called to the fish, "Oh wondrous fish, my wife has a wish." Again the fish appeared (Show fish) and asked, "What does she want?" "She wants to be king and live in a castle," said the fisherman. "Her wish is granted," said the fish as he leaped back into the sea. The fisherman returned home (Cut from 6 to 7) to find a castle where the mansion had been. (Cut B removing excess) His wife was wearing a crown. (Show B holding ends together to make a small crown)

Yet the wife was not content. "This crown is too small and too plain. I want one with a large gem in the middle. Also, I want to be emperor and live in a magnificent palace. Go back and tell the fish." The fisherman returned to the sea (Cut from 7 to 8) and called, "Oh wondrous fish, my wife has a wish." The fish appeared (Show fish) and asked, "What does she want?" The fisherman replied, "She wants a bigger crown with a gem in the middle. She wants to be emperor and live in a magnificent palace." "Her wish is granted," said the fish going back into the sea. The fisherman returned home (Cut from 8 to 9) to find a magnificent palace where the castle had been. His wife was wearing an even bigger crown. (Open paper to show the crown)

Even with all that the wife was not content. "I want to rule all of the stars and all of the planets. I want to rule the universe! Go tell the fish," said the wife. Sadly the fisherman returned to the sea and called, "Oh wondrous fish, my wife has a wish." The fish came up out the sea (Show fish) and asked, "What does she want?" The fisherman answered, "She wants to be ruler of the universe." "That she cannot do," said the fish. "She has asked for too much. She will have to be content with nothing." The fish dove back into the sea never to be seen again. The fisherman returned home to find the shack back where the palace had been. Indeed the fisherman and his wife were back where they had started - with nothing. (Crumple crown and toss)
 

Pattern


I outline my pattern in black marker. I then place it under the paper I am using. The maker shows through the paper making it easy to trace the pattern. The photo below shows this. If I were using heavier paper, I would cut out the pattern, place it on the paper and trace around it.


Below are the final pieces. I taped the small crown to show how I would hold it to show the audience.


This week's Flannel Friday Round-Up is hosted by Amanda of the Trails & Tales blog.


1 comment:

  1. These always facinate me! Thanks so much for sharing!

    ReplyDelete